McCulloch One Name Study

John McCulloch IV of Barholm1778

Name
John McCulloch IV of Barholm
Birth
Birth of a sisterIsabel Mcculloch
1718
Death of a motherJean McCulloch
1723

Death of a paternal grandfatherDavid McCulloch 1st of Ardwall
October 4, 1724

Burial of a paternal grandfatherDavid McCulloch 1st of Ardwall
October 1724
MarriageElizabeth CutlerView this family
The contract was dated at Balcary 14 August and the young couple were to have the Tower and lands of Barholm free of rent: tocher was 9,000 merks, and Elizabeth was secured in an annual rent of 700 merks.
August 14, 1738
Birth of a son
#1
John Mcculloch
1740
Death of a maternal grandfatherJohn McCulloch III of Barholm
April 28, 1747

Birth of a daughter
#2
Elizabeth Mcculloch
1750

Death of a maternal grandmotherJean Gordon
April 28, 1750
Marriage of a parentDavid McCullochEuphemie BrownView this family
1757

Death of a fatherDavid McCulloch
June 1759

Description
Boswell met McCulloch at Kirroughtrie on October 3, 1762, describing him as "a good-natured honest man, who laughed much and seemed to be very well pleased". http://www.jamesboswell.info/biography/john-mcculloch-laird-barholm
October 3, 1762
Death of a sonHenry Mcculloch
1764
Marriage of a childJames DewarElizabeth MccullochView this family
December 24, 1769

Death of a sonWilliam Mcculloch
1777
Death May 1778

Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
Marriage: January 28, 1715
4 years
sister
himself
Father’s family with Euphemie Brown - View this family
father
step-mother
Marriage: 1757
Family with Elizabeth Cutler - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: August 14, 1738Balcary, Wigtownshire, Scotland
12 years
daughter
daughter
daughter
son
son
son

Note

John McCulloch succeeded his grandfather in 1747 and, two years later, obtained a Crown Charter of the estate, subject to the liferent of his grandmother. He suffered from the family instability and is described in the entail litigation as ‘a person whose dispostion and habit rendered an easy dupe’, but the law suit shewed him to combine a certain amount of cunning with a total disregard of legal consequences. His attempt to sell Borness to his cousin, David McCulloch of Ardwall, was a case in point (see page 332). When his grandfather died it was his sister, Isabel, and not himself, who was nominated executor: and when his grandmother died, his own children were preferred to himself as executor dative644. Further in his grandfather’s last, entail of 1747, the property was left to John (iv)’s sons, then to his daughters, then to his sister, Isabel, followed by himself. It is, therefore, clear, that his weakness was recognised in the family.